Friday, August 26, 2016

Is Sjogren's triggered by autoimmune cross-targeting? So many suspects..can we divide up sjogren's into several types?

Autoimmune cross-targeting hypothesis:  the layering of 2 different infections on one target triggers autoimmune disease.

A viral infection marking the inside of the target then an external infection marking the outside. One of each is needed to trigger autoimmunity.

Sjogren's: autoimmune disease of the salivary glands (target tissue)

external infection suspects that could be marking the outside of the gland:

mycoplasmas with RA associations
fungal with hoshimoto's thyroid
spirochetes with lichen sclerosis

viral internal infection suspects:

EBV/HHV8 (using alpha estrogen receptors)
retroviruses (using thrombopoietin receptors..RANK?)
hepatitis C (using mc1 receptors)
??? HPV16 (using CB1 receptors)????

mycoplasmas and sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC477189/

RA and  sjogren's
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/808825
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2200936

personal post sjogren's and lyme
http://sjogrensvegan.blogspot.com/

estrogen alpha receptor is involved with salivary cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19559968

(i think the EBV uses the alpha estrogen receptors)

EBV and sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1848394
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1664987
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1319486
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3021847

HHV8 and sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9003115

HHV8 binds the alpha estrogen receptor
http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/13517/

retrovirus and sjogren's subgroup
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9155673
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8531355
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1628425

Rank receptor and sjogren's
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/content/42/suppl_1/144.full.pdf

Rank receptor and HIV (thrombopoietin-like receptor and retrovirus)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22842843

Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease of the moisture producing glands

salivary secretion inhibited by activation of cannabinoid receptors
 I suspect HPV viruses for some cases
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16946411

high rates of HPV with sjogren's patients?
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/acrmeeting/abstract.asp?MeetingID=781&id=95227

no correlations found here??? hpv and sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17713098

failure to find HPV in primary sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10323467

which CB receptors are there?

both CB1 and CB2
http://www.physoc.org/proceedings/abstract/Proc%20Physiol%20Soc%2021PC38
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16946411

mainly CB1?
http://www.scielo.cl/pdf/ijmorphol/v33n2/art44.pdf

If CB1 then HPV16?
http://angelabiggs.blogspot.com/2016/08/cannabinoid-receptors-and-human.html

HPV16 and EBV in salivary cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27547238

erosive oral lichen and hpv16
http://www.pasteur.fr/en/institut-pasteur/press/press-documents/human-papillomavirus-linked-auto-immune-disease

EOL and sjogren's
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2018610
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2077152

spirochetes and lichen sclerosis
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2393064
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3192771
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10792212
I can't tell if this is truly the lyme spirochete or not.

do spirochetes in humans move to the salivary gland like they do in ticks?

EOL, SJ and hepatitis C?
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1346-8138.1997.tb02733.x/abstract?systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+unavailable+on+Saturday+3rd+September+2016+at+08.30+BST/+03:30+EDT/+15:30+SGT+for+5+hours+and+Sunday+4th+September+at+10:00+BST/+05:00+EST/+17:00+SGT+for+1+hour++for+essential+maintenance.+Apologies+for+the+inconvenience

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1346-8138.1995.tb03395.x/full



Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Enteroviruses and nicotine acetylcholine receptors

Rabies binds the neurotoxin binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8887475

This neurotoxin binding site is where nicotine binds
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3448605

coxsackie virus (an enterovirus) infection is blocked by nicotine
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26851533
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26507386
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26851533

Enteroviruses might bind the same receptor family as the rabies virus.

Hypothesis:
Enveloped virus families bind specific receptor families.

Looking at the types of nicotine binding receptors:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicotinic_acetylcholine_receptor

4 subtypes (these can be further divided)

Can we match up the enteroviruses with these receptors?

2 type the exists in the spine/ ganglion (GS) sympathetic and parasympathetic (GP)

2 types in the brain (B1 and B2)

one type exists in muscles (M)

Coxsackie appears to be using the Muscle type

Polio and D68 appear to be using the Ganglion type

non-polio enteroviruses are responsible for half of aseptic meningitis in children
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17668054

Are most non- polio viruses using B1 and B2 but typically don't have access to the brain due to the blood brain barrier?

Do these viruses bind everywhere that nicotine does? Wouldn't it be strange if during enterovirus infections nicotine was given medically?

entroviruses could also bind "neural cell adhesion molecule"
http://jvi.asm.org/content/72/9/7181.full

D68 and sialic acid immunoglobulin like dependent entry
http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/151113/ncomms9865/full/ncomms9865.html

anti-nACH receptors with immunoglobulin antibodies (commercially made)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20619959 

rabies virus and sialic acid binding of receptors
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8004936

these overlaps supports the notion that the enteroviruses use nACH receptors




Wednesday, August 17, 2016

silicone replacing silicon

Silicon is normally absorbed by the body.

silicon and bone health
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2658806/

silicone or silicone: natural substance or artifical
http://www.livescience.com/37598-silicon-or-silicone-chips-implants.html

our body would not view silicone as natural

where silicon is found in the body:

hair and nails
blood vessels
skin
kidneys
lungs
bladder
adrenal cortex
prostate
testes

If silicone replaces the silicon slowly over time the body would react with inflammation, much like a viral infection.  The silicone is viewed as foreign.

Things however can become worse if an infection cross-targets with the silicone then autoimmune disease could be triggered.


Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Cannabinoid receptors and Human Papilloma Viruses

Hypothesis: Human Papilloma Viruses use the cannabinoid receptor family

Nerves, cervical cancer, hypothalamus: HPV16: CB1 receptors 
Cervical cancer, intestinal cancer : HPV18:  CB2 receptors 
Genital warts/ skin infections : HPV6 and HPV11 : GPV55 receptors ?

CB1
brain and CNS

HPV16 in nerves
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682205008020

HPV16 and pediatric epilepsy
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23280839

HPV and epilepsy
http://www.miriamgrossmanmd.com/say-its-not-so-hpv-in-the-brain/

 HPV6, HPV11, and HPV16 laryngeal cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9217136
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12938516

CB1 and larynx
http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/84717148/cannabinoids-facilitate-swallowing-reflex-elicited-by-superior-laryngeal-nerve-stimulation-rats

CB1 and breast cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4128286/

Nerves: HPV16: CB1 receptors

CB2
immune system and hematopoietic cells

CB2 in HER2 Breast cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25855725

CB2 in cervical cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26062417

CB2 intestinal tract
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2219529/

HPV18 and colorectal cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11456365

pancreatitis and CB2
http://journals.lww.com/pancreasjournal/Fulltext/2008/11000/the_Role_of_Cb2_Receptors_in_Acute_Pancreatitis.164.aspx

Cervical cancer : HPV18:  CB2 receptors

Novel CB (GPR119, GPR18, and GPR55)
endothelial cells

novel CB receptor reviews
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2190013/

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1038/sj.bjp.0707481/asset/sj.bjp.0707481.pdf?v=1&t=iry0mndh&s=23556b4f6db5dd9cee941840d82aac60d724e5c0

GPR55 and endothelial cells
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4487816/

HPV 6 and 11 causes laryngeal papillomatosis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laryngeal_papillomatosis

GPR55 and CB1 overlap???

CB1 antagonist bound GPR55
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17876300

Genital warts/ skin infections : HPV6 and HPV11 : GPV55 receptors some CB1? 

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Hypothesis: Enveloped virus families bind specific receptor families.

Hypothesis title:
Enveloped virus families bind specific receptor families.

Abstract:
Enveloped viruses are known to use receptors to trigger endocytosis into host cells.  Looking at the infection patterns of virus families, there exists a corresponding receptor family.  As the viral key mutates over time the receptor it uses slightly changes but only slightly.  The mutated new virus tends to stay within the receptor family.  If we understand the homology of receptors and their tissue expression patterns, the new virus' receptor choice should be to some degree predictable. The goal of this paper is to establish the virus families with their corresponding receptor families.

Introduction:
Vaccines prepare the immune system for viral infections. Current viral drugs attempt to inhibit viral replication.  This hypothesis supplies another avenue for defeating viral infections. If we know what receptors the viruses are using we can anticipate and slow the viral infection of host cells by competing for those receptors.

There are 4 major enveloped viral families we can immediately see this pattern with: flaviviruses, herpes viruses, flu viruses, and human papilloma viruses.  If you look at the infection patterns of these viral families it becomes clear that the herpes viruses use estrogen receptors, flaviviruses use melanocortin receptors, flu viruses use dopamine receptors, and human papilloma viruses use cannabinoid receptors.

Even more striking is that if you assume that a virus within it's virus family has an ideal receptor that it uses as an entry point into a host cell you can deduce which specific receptor this virus is using based on the symptoms of the illness caused by the virus.

The flavivirus family for example if it uses the melanocortin receptors appear to have this simple pattern:

mcr1   Tick borne encephalitis virus/ hepatitis C  (Thrombocytopenia due to red blood cells with mcr1)

mcr2 (ACTH receptor)   Zika (placenta, developing brain)

mcr3  West nile (kidneys)

mcr3 and mcr1  Japanese encephalitis

mcr4  Yellow fever (liver)
                     
mcr5  Dengue (immune system T cells)

The reactivation of herpes viruses seem to be affected by estrogen.  There are 3 types of herpes viruses which if you look at where they infect match up with the types of estrogen receptors.

Alpha-herpes viruses: Herpes simplex 1, herpes simplex 2,  herpes zoster : Estrogen-beta receptors (nerves and uterine tissue )

Beta-herpes viruses: CMV, HHV6, HHV7 :  Estrogen-related receptors (CMV binding confirmed)

Gamma-herpes viruses: EBV, HHV8 : Estrogen-alpha receptors (lymphocytes, breast involved)

Flu viruses appear to use dopamine receptors:

Here is how the 5 types of dopamine receptors (D) that might match up with the A, B, and C flu viruses

D1 and D5 are similar but have reverse expression patterns.  D5 has the highest expression at birth then it decreases. D1 slowly increases in your life and is at it's lowest at birth.

D1 is the most abundant of the central nervous system. ( D1 and D5 )

D1 type B flu (encephalitis)

D5 type C flu (infects infants)

D2 is similar to D3 and D4.   D2 is expressed on the pancreas.

Type A flu and D2 receptors ( H1N1 and D3/D4 )








Wednesday, August 10, 2016

5 types of dopamine receptors and the A, B, and C flu viruses

Here is how the 5 types of dopamine receptors might match up with the A, B, and C flu viruses (hypothesis)

D1 and D5 are similar but have reverse expression patterns.  D5 has the highest expression at birth then it decreases. D1 slowly increases in your life and is at it's lowest at birth. 

D2 is similar to D3 and D4

D1 is the most abundant of the central nervous system. ( D1 and D5 )

D2 receptors are expressed on the pancreas

Type A flu viruses appear to infect pancreatic cells

H1N1 and narcolepsy 

D2 receptors and narcolepsy connection in dogs

D3 and D4 receptors are expressed in the human heart

H1N1 infects the heart


Type A 8 RNA segments  and D2 receptors?  H1N1 and D3/D4 ?

bird flu H5N1
asian flu H2N2
hong kong flu H3N2
swine H1N1 russian flu / spanish flu 


Type B (?)  8 RNA segments and D1 receptors? (no diabetes triggered)

encephalitis linked to flu type B

Type C  (humans and pigs only) 7 RNA segments  and D5 receptors? 
causes pediatric pneumonia 


Attempting to match up herpes viruses with estrogen receptors

Are the herpes viruses binding different estrogen receptors?

The locations of the receptors seem to match up with the herpes virus families. (these are not proven associations)

Alpha-herpes viruses: Herpes simplex 1, herpes simplex 2,  herpes zoster : Estrogen-beta receptors (nerves and uterine tissue)

Beta-herpes viruses: CMV, HHV6, HHV7 :  Estrogen-related receptors (CMV binding confirmed)

Gamma-herpes viruses: EBV, HHV8 : Estrogen-alpha receptors (lymphocytes, breast involved)

estrogen alpha receptors on lymphocytes
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18569528

Review paper that covered the distinct variations of alpha estrogen receptors (different isoforms)
http://physrev.physiology.org/content/87/3/905

Looking at isoforms could further divide up the virus families even more specifically.

papers referenced with isoforms discoveries

http://emboj.embopress.org/content/19/17/4688?ijkey=05415c28b4fcc9840305690efd14a4351fec1884&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16165085?access_num=16165085&link_type=MED&dopt=Abstract

ERalpha 66 and breast cancer and ERalpha 36 is the truncated form
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18383888

ERRalpha and CMV (HHV4)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4284536/

EER is the "estrogen related receptor " which has homology to the estrogen receptor alpha but does not bind estrogen rather estrogen like ligands
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4284536/

HHV8 EREs were found to bind alpha estrogen receptors
http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/13517/

Estrogen alpha receptor and breast cancer
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14973389